22Nov2022
COVID-19 Oasis Policy Update

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Category: RECYCLING

OASISRECYCLING

#RecyclingHeroes of Global Recycling Day 2022

PRESS RELEASE 

Global Recycling Foundation        www.globalrecyclingfoundation.org

 

Global Recycling Foundation announces #RecyclingHeroes of Global Recycling Day 2022     

London, March 18, 2022

 

Immediate release – The Global Recycling Foundation today announces the 10 winners of their Recycling Heroes 2022 award marking Global Recycling Day 18th. March.

The winners of $ 1000 each are drawn from individuals and business leaders, sole traders, and multinationals who despite continuing hardships have managed to sustain their efforts to promote the value of recycling.

Ranjit Baxi, Founding President of the Global Recycling Foundation, said: “The world has been enduring exceptionally difficult times and we are delighted to have received so many remarkable entries from around the world.

“Indeed, to recognise the efforts made by a large number of start-ups despite two years of the Coronavirus pandemic, GRF has decided to make 4 additional awards of $250 each.”

 

The winners:

Schuler Rohstoff GmbH, Germany – Each year recycle about 280,000 tons of scrap –and are particularly proud that they can inspire so many women for our love of scrap. Half of the administrative staff are women empowering women and promoting their interest in the Recycling industry.

Una Mano per la Scuola, Italy – This committee made by parents of students from 6th to 14th years old (students of primary and secondary schools in Inveruno, Milan province, in Italy) is raising awareness on recycling & sustainability matters by organizing, with the support of the Municipality of Inveruno, for students to collect waste in the “Trash Challenge” for recycling as well as promoting planting of Trees by the students.

Vintz Plastic, Kenya – We are the leading plastic recycling company in Kenya recycling at least 25 tonnes of plastic waste per day. Our business model is unique because we promote circular manufacturing economy by making storage tanks and household items using the recycled plastics as the raw material. We place a strong emphasis of working with and training women in the process of collecting and sorting plastic.

Baby On The Move, New Zealand – An innovative effort to divert expired child restraints from going to landfill. Instead, together have created a stewardship solution of recycling car seat thereby reducing the waste which would otherwise be landfilled.

Ecocykle Limited, Nigeria – a youth-led social enterprise that promotes environmental sustainability, ecosystem restoration, the circular economy, and improved public health by providing effective waste management services to low-income communities who lack sustainable waste management options. Over the last two years, the company has overseen the training of more than 2000 young men and women on how to start their own waste recycling enterprises.

 

Oasis Association, South Africa – since 1952, the organisation has grown to support over 566 intellectually disabled beneficiaries. The organisations activities are all supported through the Recycling and thrift initiatives that fund 56% of Oasis annual income providing sustainable employment in recycling.

 

Brewster Bros, Scotland, UK – a family business centred on the principles of the circular economy turning CDE (concrete, demolition and excavating waste) into quality recycled products which can be sold back into the construction industries, diverting tons of waste from landfill and to create recycled product.

RecycleForce, Indiana, USA – is committed to reducing crime through employment and job training, while improving the environment through (WEE) waste electronics recycling. Since 2006, RecycleForce has safely recycled more than 65 million pounds of electronic waste while providing environmental job training to thousands.

Green Club of Lubanga Primary School, Zambia – Schoolchildren in the Green Club are promoting recycling by collecting waste drink bottles to make litter bins for keeping the school clean. One of the biggest environmental issues in schools is litter. The Green Club members collect used drink bottles littered around the school and community and use them for their Green and Clean school project.

Norwegian Refugee Council, Norway – Working in Bangladesh, to address the existing problem of plastic pollution in refugee camps, thus paving a way for more efficient solid waste management. NRC initiated Producing Shelter Materials from Recycled Plastic project in partnership with Field Ready to recycle the waste plastics produced by the Rohingya refugee community and surrounding host community people, to transform them into safe and sustainable shelter protection products

 

The four additional start-up award winners are:

Japheth Sunday, Nigeria – Japheth is reducing environmental pollution in the community with his JETSAR project by converting biowaste to electrical energy that powers the house including appliances, thus providing one answer to meet renewable energy needs in the country.

Precious Plastic, India – Precious Plastic is running a ragpicker co-operative. In this they buy plastic waste from ragpickers. This waste is recycled into plastic granules and sold to plastic product manufacturers. Profits from the sale of granules are distributed equally among the ragpickers helping the local economy.

Circular Shield, Slovenia – supporting sorted collection and recycling of used beverage cardboards, and creating a local, functioning model of circular economy as we return paper products made of regenerated cellulose.

Çelebi KALKAN, Turkey -. Celebi, a primary school teacher has been working on STEM education for sustainable development purposes since 2015. She believes in promoting educational awareness and sustainable development goals to support present and future generations who must be equipped not only with technical knowledge and skills, but also with a deeper understanding of the values needed to create a peaceful and sustainable future.

 

 

For further information contact Global Recycling Foundation team:

press@globalrecyclingfoundation.org

Ranjit Baxi +447860525159 www.globalrecyclingday.com

 

About the Global Recycling Foundation

The Global Recycling Foundation supports the promotion of recycling, and the recycling industry, across the world to showcase its vital role in preserving the future of the planet. It will promote Global Recycling Day as well as other educational programmes, awareness projects and innovation initiatives which focus on the sustainable and inclusive development of recycling.

OASISRECYCLING

Oasis Recycling etiquette

Our Claremont recycling services are open 
Monday to Friday, 8.30am – 3:30pm and Saturday, 8.30am – 1pm.

 

Here are some friendly reminders regarding recycling etiquette at Oasis:
  • Please remember to package and drop off your waste in one container.
  • Kindly pre-rinse all food containers such as cans, glass bottles etc. before delivery.
  • Kindly refrain from leaving your recycling at Oasis, should we be closed.
  • Please take careful note of items we cannot accept or recycle.

Our recycling services are limited which means we are not able to accept ALL recycling. We can only take glass, aluminium tins, all paper, cardboard, magazines and books. 

 

We can accept:

  • All paper, including newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, junk mail, circulars, office scrap, envelopes and books. If the latter is in a good condition, please consider donating it to the bookstore.
  • Brown Cardboard boxes
  • All glass bottles and jars.
  • All cooldrink cans. (Aluminium only)

We cannot accept:

  • No plastic, at all, of any sort. So, no clingwrap, no florist wrap or cellophane. No margarine tubs. None of those thin plastic packets, used for bread, milk or veggies. And no plastic or cellophane food trays, at all, whether used for meat, muffins, fruit or biscuits.
  • No food cans
  • No printed cereal boxes
  • No colour cardboard
  • No egg boxes
  • No wax-lined boxes. Including banana boxes, milk cartons, juice cartons or yoghurt boxes.
  • No styrofoam products.
  • No foil items.
  • No
  • No broken glass
  • No garden refuse, LED Batteries, medicine or light bulbs
  • Disposable nappies, food scraps, PVC like JIVE cooldrink bottles, wet waste, chemical waste or medical waste.


Please pay particular attention to this list. 

We do apologise for the inconvenience this may cause. We understand these restraints are frustrating, however COVID-19 has made the recycling of the above-listed items impractical for the time being and we simply do not have the manpower to render a full service. We will keep you up-to-date, and advise the moment these restraints are removed. Thank you for your understanding and ongoing support. 

 

Need to get in touch with us:
OASIS RECYCLING (DOMESTIC DROP-OFF/BUSINESS COLLECTIONS)
Recycling Manager – Beraldine Jagers
recycling@oasis.org.za
Cnr Lee Road and Imam Haron Claremont, 7708
021 671 2698

 

DONATIONRECYCLINGSHOPS

Decluttering is the new shopping

It’s a simple fact of life, stuff gathers! Despite our best of intentions, things just pile up. Are you downsizing? Or moving? Or, maybe you had to make space for that ‘ remote’ home office. Whatever the reason, you have ‘stuff’ lying around the house. Things you don’t want, don’t use, or are just plain tired of seeing. We can help! It doesn’t matter what it is. Unwanted furniture, electrical appliances, home ware, toys, books, sports gear, we will take it all and more, at no cost, as stock for our shops. You don’t have to wait till you move, to de-clutter and simplify. Do it today! If you have any items you need to dispose of, that are too good to actually throw away, give us a call.

When you donate to a charity like Oasis, you are making someone’s day!  Your unwanted goods, when resold, support the work of Oasis Association for Intellectual Disability.

 

FREE COLLECTION: For large items such as fridges, beds, couches and other furniture we will even collect for free within the Cape Town area!

How your donation helps:

Most charities accept gently used items, especially furniture and household goods, which can be used for resale. Oasis is no different. We will accept all gently-used items, especially:

  • furniture,
  • household goods,
  • clothes,
  • books
  • and bric-a-brac.

Your unwanted goods are then sold, in one of our Oasis shops or online, to raise money to support our beneficiaries and their families. Our shops are the heartbeat of our income. Without stock we simply cannot support our beneficiaries and their families. Our collection service is willing to collect any larger item of furniture, for free. Including those awkward, hard to transport, larger pieces of furniture or garden items you have been struggling to get rid of.

Items that Oasis accepts:

Oasis will accept:

  • all furniture donations,
  • clothing donations,
  • accessories,
  • dishes and glassware,
  • collectibles,
  • working electronics,
  • books
  • and art.

For smaller items please drop off your previously loved unwanted goods at Oasis in Claremont.

The bottom line:

Donating those items you no longer want or use to charity, benefits everyone. It’s a great way for you to get organized. And, if you are moving, our removing of your excess items will assist in making your move that little bit easier. PLUS, you will be supporting, empowering and assisting the work of Oasis Association for Intellectual Disability. For more information on our collection services email Beraldine at recycling@oasis.org.za

Find us at Corner of Lee and Imam Haron Road, Claremont. Trading hours: Monday – Friday 8:30am – 3:30pm; Saturdays 9:00am – 1pm

RECYCLINGREUSESHOPS

The Oasis with a heart of love

Used goods across the world are seen as trendy and now. The Oasis Association for Intellectual Disability has a little “village” of four shops at the corner of Lee and Imam Haron Road, Claremont. The planet benefits, as do shoppers and the Oasis Association, when people with a conscience visit our shops. The social enterprises, as well as bakery and recycling projects, provide Oasis with the means to provide developmental opportunities to more than 600 adults and children with moderate to profound disability. Opportunities include specialised daycare for children, housing through group home living, employment and occupation for adults. Eight services are stretched across the city from Claremont to Delft.

Public participation

The general public have always played a pivotal role in the work of Oasis with gifts of time, expertise, donated stock for shops and recycling materials.

“We are deeply grateful to all who play such a generous role in changing lives. The support is really humbling. Just one book donated can feed a child for a week,” says Gail Bester, Executive Director of the Oasis Association.

 

Oasis shops in Claremont

The Oasis shops stock furniture, clothing, household goods, books, games and toys, art, CDs/DVDs, electronic/electrical goods and so much more. All of these items are dropped off as donations. Among all sorts of basic household items, lovely décor items, treasures, costume jewellery, vintage clothing and original artworks can be found.

 

Recycling with Oasis

The recycling drop-off point accepts all paper, cardboard, glass jars, bottles, and aluminium beverage cans. The association appeals to recyclers to keep materials clean and separated, if possible. Oasis does not accept any plastic of any type, and also sells cardboard boxes, glass jars, shredded egg boxes for animal bedding, composting and packaging and various re-usable items.

 

Confidential document shredding

Oasis’s reputation has grown and they are fast becoming the go-to service for reliable document shredding. There is no fee, but a donation is requested which qualifies for an 18A tax exemption receipt.

 

Moving house

Inevitably, when packing up and relocating, boxes of unwanted goodies and pieces of furniture become a nuisance factor. “We will be happy to arrange collection, at no fee, for good quality donated, furniture and goods,” says Beraldine Jagers, recycling manager.

For more information on recycling, shredding or collections, email Beraldine at recycling@oasis.org.za

OASISRECYCLINGSHOPS

Reduce your spending by shopping for previously used products at Oasis

In the past we all thought we had to buy brand new products. This way we spent way too much and often our money ran out before the month did. But fast forward a few years and it is now not only acceptable, but it is trendy to shop from “secondhand shops,” or as some would have it, gently used, previously loved or vintage shops.

Ultimately, it doesn’t matter what you call it, pre-loved shopping not only saves money, but it also saves the planet, and often it benefits a wider cause or small local business. We have all seen charity shops, book exchanges, used furniture shops, entire product lines made from recycled materials and objects, and those wonderful boutiques where exquisite clothing, often once worn, is affordable. Antique shops sell used items – i.e. The items in an antique shop must be used items to qualify as antiques!

Charity shops are not focused on retail sales but rather are a means to an end which could support a cause such as people with disability.

 

Your saving money by shopping at these shops becomes mindful shopping with conscience.  Their shelves are usually packed with all sorts of quirky, interesting treasures, scattered amongst entirely everyday items. It is not unusual to see a beautiful crystal glass juxtaposed against a cheap coffee mug. These conscience shops offer a wide range of products dependent on what the donors donate. Stock changes constantly, so you never know what you will find, and you need to keep popping in. But they are guaranteed to save you money.

Several entrepreneurs have set up businesses around selling products made from recycled materials or by just selling on used goods.  At these stores, items like used wooden pallets and cardboard boxes are sold at much less than the original price.  Reuse and recycling are two of the chief pillars to managing our domestic waste.

Buy local.  Support your local charity shops and businesses selling used products.

 

 

UPCYCLING

2021 is the year of upcycling. Many people find themselves in a financial squeeze and it is time for a little out-of-the-box creative thinking.  Anyone can join the upcycling revolution.

Upcycling most often “… creates a product of higher quality or value than the original.”   It is all about a splash of creativity, taking something old, and worn, and turning it into something chic, modern, and useful.

A full-length evening dress is the new mini dress. The rusted wheelbarrow becomes a planter. The china teacup sans its saucer, is a sugar bowl. Plastic bottles are bird feeders. A surplus dining table cut down to size is a new coffee table. New upholstery, a lick of paint, and new handles can create beautiful trendy furniture.

Look around your own home or your local used product shop and get started with an upcycling project.

For a little inspiration simply Google upcycling ideas. There is a wealth of ideas online that are sure to get your creative juices flowing.

 

Stay up to date with our news and upcycling tips on our Facebook page.

Contact us 021 671 2698 or email us info@oasis.org.za

Find us at  the Corner of Lee Road and Imam Haron Road , Claremont, 7708

Trading hours: Monday – Friday 8:30am – 3pm;

Saturdays 9am – 1pm.

RECYCLING

Level 3 Oasis recycling update

Oasis Recycling is open for business with level 3 restrictions in place.

Our Claremont recycling services re-opened Monday, 1 February 2021 at 9 am.

Our services are operational Monday to Friday, 8.30am – 3pm and Saturday, 8.30am – 1pm.

Here are some friendly reminders regarding recycling etiquette at Oasis:

    • Please remember to package and drop off your waste in one container.
    • Kindly pre-rinse all food containers such as cans, milk bottles etc. before delivery.
    • Kindly refrain from leaving your recycling at Oasis, should we be closed.
    • Please take careful note of items we cannot accept or recycle.

Our recycling services are still limited. Which means we are still not able to accept ALL recycling. We can only take glass, aluminium tins, all paper, cardboard, magazines and books.


We can accept:

  • All paper, including newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, junk mail, circulars, office scrap, envelopes and books. If the latter is in a good condition, please consider donating it to the bookstore.
  • Cardboard, so all boxes, toilet roll inners, cereal boxes and egg boxes, if cardboard.
  • All glass bottles and jars.
  • All cooldrink cans.

 

We cannot accept:

  • Plastic, at all, of any sort. So, no clingwrap, no florist wrap or cellophane. No margarine tubs. None of those thin plastic packets, used for bread, milk or veggies. And no plastic or cellophane food trays, at all, whether used for meat, muffins, fruit or biscuits.
  • No wax-lined boxes. Including banana boxes, milk cartons, juice cartons or yoghurt boxes.
  • Styrofoam products.
  • Foil items.
  • Tissues.
  • Disposable nappies, food scraps, PVC like JIVE cooldrink bottles, wet waste or medical waste.

 

Please pay particular attention to this list.

We do apologise for the inconvenience this may cause.

We understand these restraints are frustrating, however COVID-19 has made the recycling of the above listed items impractical for the time being and we simply do not have the manpower to render a full service.

We will keep you up-to-date, and advise the moment these restraints are removed.

 

Thank you for your understanding and ongoing support during these trying times.

 

Need to get in touch with us:

OASIS RECYCLING (DOMESTIC DROP-OFF/BUSINESS COLLECTIONS)

Recycling Manager – Beraldine Jagers
recycling@oasis.org.za

Cnr Lee Road and Imam Haron
Claremont, 7708
021 671 2698

RECYCLING

Oasis recycling closed

COVID UPDATE 2020: Oasis recycling will remain closed for now. The Oasis recycling depot is unfortunately still unable to operate during level 4 COVID-19 lockdown. Our core business is to provide care and opportunities for our people with intellectual disability. Our first priority has to be their welfare and we cannot operate our recycling depot without placing them at risk.

Our biggest source of income comes from recycling which has suddenly been withdrawn. Recycling companies, like all other companies, face challenges at this time and some are unable to purchase materials from us now. At this stage we anticipate being able to re-open in level 2. We thank all of our recycling supporters for many years of support. We hope to return stronger! recycling@oasis.org.za
OASISRECYCLING

An oasis that keeps growing

The Oasis Association in Cape Town was the first winner of the Mail & Guardian‘s Greening the Future award for non-profit organisations in 2003. Over the past decade, the organisation has moved mountains — and not just of trash — to ensure that people with intellectual disabilities are empowered.

Oasis is proof that green success stories, which highlight the reduction of people’s effect on the environment, are also about human development. The organisation employs people with intellectual disabilities on recycling projects. Its stated mission is “to enable persons with intellectual disability to realise their fullest potential at each stage of their development, and thereby become as independent and productive as possible within the community“. Moderate, mild, severe or profound intellectual disabilities affect about 3% of all people worldwide.

Oasis started in 1952 when a group of parents found a solution to the problem of their children being excluded from mainstream society by starting their own school — an oasis — for children with intellectual disabilities. Today the organisation provides employment opportunities, skills development training, daycare centres and residential homes for more than 450 people in the greater Cape Town area. In 2003, the Greening the Future judges praised Oasis as “a special and unique project with a holistic approach to integrating social concerns and environmental issues”. “It has explored the question of recycling and reuse of resources very efficiently, even venturing into areas where no one else bothered to go,” the judges said at the time.

The Oasis workforce consists of people with various intellectual disabilities who are employed in recycling and waste management projects that generate income for the association and contribute to its self-sustainability. Executive director Gail Bester says Oasis has seen “a lot of growth” since winning the Greening the Future award 10 years ago. “This is obvious not only from our statistical information, but also the qualitative enhancement both to Oasis’s projects and the work lives of people with intellectual disability.” In 2003 the organisation processed between 60 and 78 tonnes of mixed recyclable waste a month, generating an annual turnover of R166 202. By the end of the 2011-2012 financial year it was processing more than 203 tonnes of recycling a month, which, together with two shops it has opened, yielded a trading income of more than R4-million. In November 2003, just months after winning Greening the Future, Oasis was awarded a tender to manage Old Mutual’s waste and recycling at the company’s head office in Pinelands. “We currently have 362 intellectually disabled workers who are hard at work on three recycling projects and who, together with the shops, generated 47.3% of our income at the end of the last financial year,” says Bester. “Our recycling project has won more national and international awards over the years. As a result, it is probably true to say that today we are better known for our recycling efforts rather than for the fact that we are leaders in the disability field.”

As word spread about its recycling project, the Western Cape department of environmental affairs and development planning asked it to present a best-practice model to more than 300 delegates at the Cape Town waste minimisation summit in 2010. Bester says Oasis has come up with a “win-win situation for all” and that it is a working model of the triple bottom line in sustainability: “We meet a social need by providing intellectually disabled adults with employment, which creates income for the workers and the organisation. And we provide an easy solution for Cape Town residents in terms of disposing of their recyclable waste, resulting in a very significant saving of landfill space.” Desiree Behr, the donor development manager at Oasis, says the company launched various other income-generating projects over the years because “funding is always a major issue for non-governmental organisations”. “Although we raised 55.5% of our income last year through our trading activities and investments, we are still dependent on donors to fund the more welfare-focused aspects of our services, such as day centres and residential facilities,” says Behr. “State subsidies accounted for 28.5% of our income last year, but we had to raise the rest through fundraising events and appeals to corporate donors, trusts and foundations, and individuals.”

Two shops selling recycled bric-a-brac and books were opened in Claremont and Pinelands, generating at least R2-million last year. Oasis now also runs a bakery and tea garden in Claremont to earn cash. The bakery “initially focused on producing bread for our daily feeding scheme for the poor. But the tantalising aroma of fresh, hot bread and the spread of word-of-mouth advertising led to requests from members of the public for the bread to be made available to them too,” says Behr. Oasis was voted a Greening the Future winner because of its “comprehensive sustainability, environmental innovation and social involvement”.

Ten years later, the evidence shows they were right.

Article initially appeared in the Mail and Guardian